At 42 Degrees

At 42 Degrees

Thursday, August 16, 2012

Gluten-less Glee,....


Glee without Gluten?

Check out the gluten-free cookies I baked for a recent game-night with my guys! They tasted as good as they look, and they didn't last long with my guys.

And be honest if you didn't know they didn't have gluten in them - you'd never say just by the looks: "Hey, those are gluten free cookies."

The cookies were surprisingly available and easy to make. I made these chocolate chip cookies from a Betty Crocker gluten-free mix - I purchased at Walmart. I will say - they weren't cheap - around $4.50 - but they made nearly two dozen and I actually liked the 'lighter texture' than heavy-gummy wheat made cookies.

And why gluten-free?

For Mr. Isaac, of course.

Week before last, my husband and I discussed the benefits of trying a gluten-free diet for Isaac. It may help and it may not help with his issues, but it certainly won't hurt. And as it is such a healthier diet we don't have any qualms about trying.

Simply put, we love Isaac more than we love bread.

Not that you can't have bread on a gluten-free diet,...you can, but gluten-free breads in particular are pricy - even if you make them yourselves, so we are reserving that option for when a sandwich or toast attack hits.

So far, we've liked all the gluten-free products we've tried, breads, crackers and cookies. In particular, I've found some adorable animal cracker cookies made with arrowroot, which were soooo good I had to hid them from my bigger guys - lest they consume Isaac's entire stash!

So what are we eating?

Breakfast: oatmeal, scrambled egg, and whatever fruit is Isaac's current favorite - strawberries lately.

Lunch: lean protein like sliced chicken, tofu or tuna, with fruit and gluten-free crackers or chips. Or energy bites - made from peanut butter, oats and dried fruit whirled in the food processor - great for traveling or quick snacks.

Supper: protein: turkey, beef, fish, vegetables - whatever we are having I put them on Isaac's plate and he may or may not eat them like any other two year old - he likes okra, peas, carrots. We always have fruit, and a starch, either potatoes, brown rice, and some type bean - which I count as a starch - like kidney beans, black beans, or chick peas. If we have beans, I add cornbread, rice or nuts to help round out the protein potential in the beans.

We're eating lots more vegetables and fruit in our diet - and that's always a good thing.

Eating out is difficult - we tend to order salads now - and French fries - with a protein - like fish, or chicken fingers and then we take off the breading to give them to Isaac.


Here's Isaac's plate from recent post-therapy lunch at Whole Foods - it was lots cheaper than a Happy Meal and he did have more raspberries - but he gobbled those down before I could get my camera out!



Process foods are loaded with gluten - the biggest surprise was soy-sauce - but I found a gluten-less brand that tastes BETTER than the regular soy-sauce I've used for years - so yeah, on stretching boundaries.

I've made a gluten-free chocolate cake - fantastic - so birthdays are checked off.
Those cookies are good enough to take to ANY potluck - so we can still socialize.
Eating out - will be a new adventure as we try new foods and restaurants.

All in all - we're pretty gleeful about being gluten-free.




Our PECS project hasn't gotten off the ground. Isaac gets the concept in therapy but in day to day - he seems to rather sign and his signing is taking off - he knows and uses: 15 signs.

Verbal comes and goes - classic Apraxia.

He's teething molars - so none of us have had much sleep this summer - and that's tough.

Like any other family with a special needs child - we're just hanging in there the best we can - trusting in the Lord and grateful for each day.

Until I post again,...may God bless and keep you!

1 comment:

  1. "Like any other family with a special needs child - we're just hanging in there..." This is something that I still haven't grasped, socially speaking. People ask all the time "how's Tessa?" and "Is she doing any better?" It's a hard question to answer because we have good days and bad days, but no days are typical. "Getting better?..." hmm...we may make progress on a symptom, but I'm not one looking to cure my daughter. I just want her to be comfortable in her own skin and reach Her full potential. I need to ponder a standard answer "hanging in there" may work...

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